Artwork

 

Adam J Widener • Jewelry Cave Collection

 

The purpose of this Jewelry Cave Collection is to convey the idea that beauty and valuable treasures can be found in the darkest of places. By using disjointed graphic design and typography from a bygone era as the centerpiece for these compositions, my focus is to take something familiar yet process it through the last 50 years of commercial deterioration. Think of it as a sort of Xeroxed neon kaleidoscope of trash.

The Jewelry Cave is an endless maze of low budget design and disposable pop art aesthetics. Yet at its core, lies a type of odd attraction fueled by nostalgia and forgotten whimsy. There is hopefully something there for everyone. But only for those raised by the banality of 70’s and 80’s suburb culture.

The chosen color palette is comprised of black, white, pink and orange and printed on traditional canvas. This was primarily done to ensure a timeless motif while staying true to standardized fine art techniques. The distressed quality of the black and white inks connects to a cheap Xerox theme while the hot neon pinks and oranges break through to create a vibrant glow.

 

Welcome to the Jewelry Cave. Let’s go exploring.

 

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Born and raised in Midwest America, Adam J. Widener discovered art and design at an early age through the encouragement of his grandmother who was an accomplished landscape painter. Influenced by the world of advertising and low budget design, Adam graduated from the Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design with a BFA. Since moving out to San Francisco, Adam has used his talents for not only the underground fine art world, but the graphic design industry as well.

Adam’s work has been featured in such places as Gestalt (SF), Lemoart Gallery (Berlin), Museum Strathroy-Caradoc (Ontario), Opus Arcade (Palo Alto) and Art Attack! (SF). He is currently working on his first graphic novel.

He’s always designing. Always making art. Always making music. Never growing up.

 

adam.j.widener@gmail.com

adamwidener.com

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